Pregnancy Checklist

Postpartum - Month 1 (weeks 1-4)
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Hold your baby skin-to-skin frequently while in the hospital.

Month 1

Skin-to-skin time has many important health benefits for both you and your baby.

It helps keep the baby warm and calm and gives parents a deep sense of attachment or bonding.

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Educational

TEAM

Self

Make sure a pediatrician examines your baby in the hospital or birth center within 24 hours of birth.

Month 1

The pediatrician will make sure your baby is looking healthy and responding well.

Your baby will receive some tests such as:
• A hearing test to detect hearing loss.
• A blood test to screen for sickle-cell disease, hypothyroidism, and other inherited disorders.

Your baby will receive the 1st dose of the hepatitis B vaccine.

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Doctor

If you are breastfeeding, plan to nurse your baby every 2 to 3 hours.

Month 1

Frequent nursing helps with breast engorgement and also helps establish your milk supply.

At first, your baby will probably feed more often at night than during the day. This is normal and temporary. Aim for eight or more feedings in 24 hours.

Your baby should have a weight check a day or two after discharge.

Eat well (~450 to 500 additional calories compared to pre-pregnancy) and drink plenty of fluids while breastfeeding.

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Family

Complete paperwork for your baby’s birth certificate before you leave the hospital or birth center.

Month 1

When completing their baby’s birth certificate form, both parents will need to provide their social security numbers, full name, maiden name, and mailing address. Parents should have proof of identification, such as a driver’s license or a passport are both valid.

The time that it takes to get a physical copy of your baby’s birth certificate might vary from a week or two to up to a month.

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Personal

TEAM

Family

Notify your insurance company of your baby's birth.

Month 1

Most insurance companies only give you up to 30 days to add your baby to your insurance plan.

If you are on Medicaid or cannot afford health insurance for your baby, apply for coverage under the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Personal

TEAM

Insurance

Schedule your baby's first check up with your pediatric provider.

Month 1

Most pediatric providers will see your baby within 3-5 days of birth, and then at the following intervals throughout his or her first year of life: 1 month, 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months.

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Doctor

Take an Emotional Wellness Screen in the early postpartum stage.

Month 1

Although the "baby blues" are common after having a baby, they should resolve after 2 weeks.

If you have symptoms of depression or anxiety that last longer than 2 weeks after giving birth, or if you have thoughts of harming your baby, call your OB provider.

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Self

Schedule your postpartum follow-up visits with your OB provider (multiple visits may be needed).

Month 1

The purpose of this appointment is to make sure you’re recovering well from labor and birth. You should go to these visits even if you're feeling fine.

If you had gestational hypertension or preeclampsia, you should have a blood pressure check 2 to 3 days postpartum.

If you have any chronic conditions or had delivery complications or a C-section, you should schedule an early postpartum visit for 2 to 3 weeks after delivery.

Schedule your comprehensive postpartum visit for about 4 to 6 weeks postpartum, but no later than 12 weeks postpartum.

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Doctor

If you’re breastfeeding, make an appointment with a lactation consultant.

Month 1

The most highly-trained lactation consultant is an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC).

Lactation consultants can help you with positioning your baby correctly, solving latch problems, or determining how to handle night feedings. They can also help with issues like an oversupply of milk, a low supply of milk, transitioning to work, or learning to pump.

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Self

Go to your baby's 1-month well-baby visit.

Month 1

Your pediatric provider will take measurements, do developmental surveillance, conduct a psychosocial/behavioral assessment, and perform a physical exam.

Your baby may get a tuberculosis (TB) skin test if your pediatric provider determines that your baby is at high risk.

The 2nd dose of the hepatitis B vaccine will be given at either this or the next well-baby visit.

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Doctor

Place your baby on his or her back to sleep.

Month 1

Healthy babies are safest when sleeping on their backs at nighttime and during naps. Side or belly sleeping is not safe until your baby can roll over independently.

Your baby should sleep alone, on his or her back, on a firm sleep surface that meets current safety standards. Do not use a car seat or rock-n-play for sleep.

Keep soft objects, loose bedding, or any objects that could increase the risk of entrapment, suffocation, or strangulation from your baby's sleep area. Make sure your baby's head and face remain uncovered during sleep.

Place your baby in a smoke-free environment. Do not smoke or have smokers care for your baby.

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Personal

TEAM

Family

Try to rest as much as possible or sleep when your baby sleeps.

Month 1

New moms and dads are often surprised by just how drained and exhausted they are, and at times, feel as if they’ll never be rested again.

Accept help from your partner, family, and friends.

TASK TYPE

To Do

PURPOSE

Personal

TEAM

Self

Which medications should I avoid while breastfeeding?

Month 1

The good news is that most medications are compatible with breastfeeding, and for those few medications that are a safety issue, there are usually acceptable substitutions.

TASK TYPE

To Ask

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Doctor

How should I care for my perineum or C-section incision after delivery?

Month 1

If you had an episiotomy or vaginal tear during delivery, the wound might hurt for a few weeks or longer.

If you had a C-section, you’ll want to ensure that the resulting wound heals well to minimize scar tissue.

TASK TYPE

To Ask

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Doctor

How do I know if my baby is getting enough milk?

Month 1

Keeping track of wet and poopy diapers along with the color of poops will give you a clue.

Here are some good guidelines:
• Your baby should breastfeed 8-12 times in 24 hours.
• 1 wet diaper and 1 dark, sticky stool on the first day of life.
• 2 wet diapers and 2 dark stools on the second day of life.
• 3 wet diapers and 2-3 green, less sticky stools on the third day of life.
• By day 5, your baby should have at least 6 wet diapers and at least 2-3 bright yellow mustard, seedy stools every 24 hours. This may change after the first 4-6 weeks.

It is normal for your baby's first stools to be dark (called meconium). After that, the poop of a breastfed baby is typically yellow-green with seedy texture. Formula-fed babies normally have yellow to brown color poops with a peanut butter consistency.

TASK TYPE

To Ask

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Doctor

Is my baby getting enough Vitamin D?

Month 1

Vitamin D is a nutrient that helps build bones and boosts the immune system.

Even though breast milk and formula give newborns almost all of the nutrition they require, it's common for babies to fall short on vitamin D.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that all babies and children get 400 IU of vitamin D daily.

Your pediatric provider can tell you whether a prescription or over-the-counter vitamin supplement is necessary for your baby.

TASK TYPE

To Ask

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Doctor

Which vaccines do you recommend for my baby?

Month 1

TASK TYPE

To Ask

PURPOSE

Medical

TEAM

Doctor

What is my mental health coverage?

Month 1

Women of every culture, age, income level, and race can develop perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs). Symptoms can appear any time during pregnancy and the first 12 months after childbirth.

While many women experience some mild mood changes during or after the birth of a child, 15 to 20% of women experience more significant symptoms of depression or anxiety.

There are effective and well-researched treatment options to help you recover, including therapy and medications.

TASK TYPE

To Ask

PURPOSE

Financial

TEAM

Insurance

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